Benveniste: Cavendish Lecture Summary

The late Dr Jacques Benveniste, MD was a highly respected French Immunologist and researcher. Respected that is, until he began to research the biological effects of “high dilution” substances. When Dr Benveniste refused to deny what his research was proving, he was defunded and eventually lost his position at INSERM which is the French Institute of Health and Medical Research.

His research appeared to prove the concept that there was some kind of  “information” remaining in a solution even after all the molecules of a biologically active substance had been diluted out of that solution. This “information” was able to cause a similar biological reaction as the original substance, basically the same claim made by homeopathy.

Dr Benveniste was invited to give this lecture at Cambridge University, UK by Professor Brian Josephson. Professor Josephson won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1973 for his theoretical work on superconductivity. Josephson was very familiar with the criticism and scoffing which often comes from inferior minded people who are stuck in the past and unable or unwilling to think “outside of the box.” Professor Josephson stayed his course and eventually proved his theories of superconductivity now known as the “Josephson Effect.”

In this lecture, Dr Benveniste gives the details of some of his “high dilution” research. His research suggests that cells, rather then being activated by direct physical contact of matching receptors, are activated by electromagnetic signaling.

By using a sound recorder, Benveniste recorded the signals of different substances. He then replayed those signals to water and  agitated the water similar to the way homeopathic remedies are successed each time after they are diluted.

The following is a list of some of the experiments reviewed in Benveniste’s lecture:

One of his first experiments was to cause basophil degranulation by water. There were no actual anti-IgE antibodies present in the water, only the imprinted, digital,  signal of anti-IgE antibodies and yet, it caused the same biological effect.

Another experiment was to cause heart muscle tissue to contract when exposed to water imprinted with the signal of a stimulant.

Digitally recorded drug induces similar dilation effect as actual drug.

Digitally recorded blood coagulation inhibiting drug causes the same effect as the actual drug.

Dr Benveniste has a strong French accent but it is well worth the effort to listening to this fascinating lecture.